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Welcome to Sinagua Sunwatchers

Seasonal calendars were a foundation of early cultures to identify the time for hunting and gathering, planting and harvesting, worshiping and celebrating.  Solar seasonal calendars have been identified at Ancestral Puebloan sites in Arizona and New Mexico, at Hohokam sites in the Phoenix region, and at Northern Sinagua locations near Flagstaff, Arizona.  While there have been anecdotal reporting of rock art with solar significance within Southern Sinagua areas, none had been documented until recently.  This site describes the solar markings near Sedona, Arizona.  The Southern Sinagua created these rock art sites sometime between A.D. 900 and 1400.

Archaeoastronomy
Archaeoastronomy is one of the disciplines that has appeared in recent years as a way of interpreting rock art. Numerous interactions have been claimed for sites around the world, and especially here in the Southwestern United States. This site provides a general introduction to this field of study.

Ongoing Surveys
The first archaeoastronomy survey in the Sedona area was conducted at the V-Bar-V Heritage Site in 2005-2006. Several other sites are currently under study and are in various stages of completion. My survey focus is to record a site for a full year before passing judgment on its solar significance. You are invited to follow the progress of these studies.

Hope you enjoy browsing the site.

Conference on Archaeoastronomy
of the American Southwest

Charting a Formal Methodology for Cultural Astronomy Research

June 6 – 8, 2014

Arizona State University School of Earth and Space Exploration
Marston Exploration Theater, Tempe, Arizona

The School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University, in Tempe Campus, will host the 2014 conference and pre-conference workshop.   The new headquarters for this School includes the Marston Exploration Theater: a Definiti-SkySkan facility with incomparable visualization technologies sure to unravel the most mind-bending of astronomic orientations.   

For details visit the Society for Cultural Astronomy of the American Southwest.